Save The Ribble

A blog dedicated to preserving the beauty and delicate ecosystem of the River Ribble, and opposing the Riverworks 'vision' to build a barrage on our River and develop on our riverbanks, floodplains and green spaces, causing damage to wildlife and the environment and increasing the risk of flooding to our homes. Save the Ribble Campaign is not responsible for the content of external blogs or websites which link here.

Monday, August 13, 2007

Tales and Pictures from the Riverbank

A visitor to Penwortham, Chris from Norfolk, sent in these pictures, saying he is so impressed by the beauty, and peace and quiet of the River and green spaces in the Broadgate, Penwortham, and Frenchwood areas which run along the beautiful River Ribble, he is looking to move here as soon as he can - as he says, 'Where else can people boast of having all this unspoilt beauty on their doorstep?'...






Birds at low tide sunning themselves on the exposed stones of the river bed...


...and other Ribblesiders can be seen on the exposed flats of low tide enjoying this beautiful summer weather too...




Ribbleside - space to breathe!

Thanks Chris!


The appreciation of the power and beauty and environmental integrity of the River Ribble, and the threat facing this magnificent agent of Nature, has caused many local residents to reflect on how they feel about the irreplaceable value of this area, and its own vital existence beyond the narrow and ill-conceived aims of economic gain.
Aidan of Frenchwood sent us an extract from a poem by T. S. Eliot which struck him as particularly relevant...

I do not know much about gods; but I think that the river
Is a brown god - sullen, untamed and intractable,
Patient to some degree, at first recognised as a frontier;
Useful, untrustworthy, as a conveyor of commerce;
Then only as a problem confronting the builder of bridges.
The problem once solved, the brown god is almost forgotten
By the dwellers in cities - ever, however, implacable,
Keeping his seasons and rages, destroyer, reminder
Of what men choose to forget. Unhonoured, unpropitiated
By worshippers of the machine, but waiting, watching and waiting.


'Dry Salvages' from T. S. Eliot's 'Four Quartets'.


This poem is also a stark reminder that we Ribblesiders have been very lucky this summer - only a few localised floods - due entirely to the efficient drain the Ribble provides to a huge area of Lancashire, taking the unprecedented levels of rainwater safely down to the sea...


Jim B joined the Ribblesiders Ribble Coast & Wetlands Walk to Brockholes on 4th August, and sent in a link to some of the photos he took of the event, which you can look at here Jim's Ribble Walk to Brockholes pics...


The following pictures were sent in by JB of Middleforth who, like many Ribblesiders, spends as much time as possible messing about by the River and on the Penwortham Green Belt - come rain or shine (which is just as well, given the RAIN this summer!).

From the River in all her moods and at all tides...


...from a lazy river meandering by on a beautiful warm day...


...to low tide, always a pleasure for ALL Ribblesiders...


...to high rainfall, which brings high river levels - even at Neap tides as here...


...yet even the rain brings its own beauty to the river, in sight and in sound...


...including the roar of the Ribble's spate waters as they churn by.

The diverse and fabulous green spaces which run back from the Ribble's banks offer their own delights...


...from fabulous riverbank trees...


...which still look impressive even when the River levels are threatening their roots...


...to diverse green spaces of barley fields...


...and meadows, rich with numerous grasses...


...and wildflowers...

...and of course whatever the weather, Ribblesiders are enjoying the Ribble's wildlife wherever possible...


...insects form the basis of the foodchain...


...although the odd bag of breadcrumbs is always welcome for the ducks!


The Ribble's numerous Swans always manage to maintain a more dignified air...




...and all this is STILL only 5 minutes walk from a busy city centre...


For more of this summer's Ribbleside pictures, see The Ribble Cycle Diaries...

Contact us at savetheribble@tiscali.co.uk

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"The care of rivers is not a question of rivers, but of the human heart" Tanako Shozo Save The Ribble Logo